The things they say...

‘Neither FIFA nor its President have anything to hide, nor do they wish to.’

Blatter press release, 28 January, 2003


BBC Panorama Reporter Andy Davies:

‘A one million franc bribe … is it not correct that Mr Blatter asked that it be moved to the FIFA official who was named on the payment slip?’

FIFA Director of Communications Markus Siegler:

‘If you do not stop now, then we call the security and we put you out.’

FIFA Press conference, Zurich, Tuesday, 11 April 2006


‘I am deputy chairman of the finance committee of FIFA. I oversee a budget of US$2 billion and I have never seen one iota of corruption.’

Jack Warner, Trinidad Express 12 December 2004


‘Lying and deception and bad faith are standard operating procedure at FIFA.’

Adam C. Silverstein, a lawyer for MasterCard in their successful action against FIFA, New York, December 1, 2006


‘I do not believe a Jew can ever be a referee at that level (Argentine Premier League) because it’s hard work and, you know, Jews don’t like hard work.’

FIFA senior vice-president and chair of Finance Committee, Julio Grondona, 5 July 2003. Buenos Aires


‘FIFA is a healthy, clean and transparent organisation with nothing to hide. There is huge public interest in FIFA, therefore we have to be as transparent as possible. We will try to communicate in a more open way so the world can believe us and be proud of their federation.’

FIFA General Secretary Urs Linsi, January 2003, on fifa.com


 

FIFA’s 10 Commandments: Does Sepp Blatter honour them?

By Andrew Jennings

 

Thursday June 3, 2010

 

In turn hilarious and deadly serious, from the Pulpit to the Confessional, Andrew Jennings highlights the issues facing FIFA on the eve of the World Cup in South Africa. On its website FIFA lays out its values. But does it live up to them?

 

 

Authenticity?

 

FIFA president Blatter talks of the ‘family of football.’ But it's his family, especially nephew Philippe Blatter, has done best out of the World Cup! And how Sepp Blatter apes the life-style of real-world presidents.

 

Unity?

 

Yes indeed – FIFA congresses seem modelled on North Korea – or a Mafia family gathering – a celebration of the Dear Leader, or the Boss of Bosses. How Blatter’s ‘family’ ticks the boxes that define Organised Crime - and the money that lubricates the FIFA machine. The worries of football fans are never heard.

 

Performance?

 

Fans judge FIFA’s performance on how fairly it distributes World Cup tickets. FIFA warns fans against the Black market – but the biggest ticket tout is a FIFA official!

 

Integrity?

 

What has Sepp Blatter done about courtroom revelations that officials grabbed around US$100 million in kickbacks on contracts?

 

Fair play?

 

From the pulpit Andrew asks, does FIFA believe in fair play? There is indisputable evidence of vote-rigging at FIFA congresses and dubious payments to FIFA officials that helped Germany win the vote to host the 2006 World Cup. And then there’s the blazer who a judge accused of ‘fabricating’ evidence!

 

Tolerance?

 

FIFA talks the talk about being against  racism and discrimination – but won’t take action against a senior FIFA official who denounced Jews as ‘lazy.’ And FIFA discriminates against poor street traders in South Africa – in favour of rich ‘partners’ like McDonalds.

 

Sportsmanship?

 

Oh dear, were these World Cup games fixed?  And look out reporters in South Africa, here comes the FIFA Thought Police.

 

Transparency?

 

Sepp Blatter in the confessional. If he wants absolution he must publish the minutes of committee meetings, reveal his salary, disclose the bonuses he pays himself. And he must set up an Independent FIFA Anti-Corruption Commission.

 

Is FIFA really for the Game?

 

Or is football only a vehicle to keep Sepp Blatter in endless power? And does he really have a ‘love affair’ with Africa? Or is it the continent’s votes that he craves?

 

Develop the Game?

 

That’s part of FIFA’s Mission Statement. But in South Africa it is vast stadiums, many of little use after the tournament, that are being developed, not grass roots facilities. The condition of some ‘sports’ grounds in the townships of the Cape are worse than those on the notorious Robben Island in the nearby bay.

 

A Nobel Peace prize for ‘Saint’ Joseph Blatter?

 

The fans don’t think so. In Korea they booed him at the Opening Ceremony and he avoided the awarding of the World Cup in Berlin in 2006, fearing more booing.

 

 

 

Director & Concept

Albert Knechtel for ARTE, June 2010

 

Camera

Frank Lehmann

Felix Sorger

 

Film Editor

Felix Sorger

 

Graphic Artist

Stefan Matlik